LoggingThe Ultimate Guide

your open-source resource for understanding, analyzing, and troubleshooting system logs

curated byloggly

David Liedle

Programming passionately since 1988, David opened his own development studio in Central Georgia a decade later. From 1998-2001 he built his business around the country and, in January of 2001, incorporated in the State of Georgia. As the web development industry continued to grow out of its infancy, David began to apply his skills and experience to startups that were advancing the state of the industry, leading teams in Georgia, Hawaii, Virginia, New York, California, Florida, and Arizona. David’s work continues to sharpen the cutting edge of what is possible on the web, and has been validated with awards, industry certifications, and media attention from the likes of Reader’s Digest and PC Magazine. David lives in Denver, Colorado with his wife Ekaterina and their son Solomon. He enjoys hiking in the mountains, connecting with other developers at local meet-ups, and quiet evenings at home with his family. He is actively involved in the development industry, mentoring other programmers and giving presentations at various tech gatherings related to the technologies he enjoys, and writing about best practices on numerous development stacks.

Node

Node Logging Basics

Node provides an easily extensible logging system, allowing you to control which messages get logged and to where they are output. Additionally, it has good support for structured logging using JSON. JSON allows more advanced logging patterns such as recording data fields for analysis and extending log objects to track complex call graphs. We’ll give examples for each of these in the sections below. Popular Libraries There are a large...

Node

Analyzing Node Logs

Analyzing millions of log lines from a production server can be quite difficult. Command line tools are nice for looking a logs streaming by on a console when doing development.  However, when analyzing production logs there are higher volumes of data, and you need automated tools to query and summarize the logs. If the data is in the Apache log format such as Morgan logs, it’s slightly easier to analyze...

Node

Troubleshooting with Node Logs

Now that your logs are being stored and you have the tools to analyze production-scale log volume, you’ll want to use them to troubleshoot production problems. With a number of tools and techniques at your disposal, it can be daunting to choose the best approach. We’ve chosen to focus on production logging, either to a file or streamed to a log management tool. Logs that float past on your console...

Node

Centralizing Node Logs

When you’re logging in applications, a good practice to follow is centralizing logs. What this means is to store them in a central location. This includes things such as shared file systems; servers such as MySQL/PostgreSQL, Riak, and Cassandra; as well as remote logging services, such as Loggly. Benefits of Centralizing Logs Keeping all of the log data in a central location makes it easy to extract and query later,...

This guide will help software developers and system administrators become experts at using logs to better run their systems. This is a vendor-neutral, community effort featuring examples from a variety of solutions. Each guide includes:

  • A basic overview of what’s in the logs and where to find them
  • How to search or analyze logs to find valuable information
  • How to troubleshoot common issues and find the root cause
  • How to centralize or aggregate logs in a large distributed system

This guide will help software developers and system administrators become experts at using logs to better run their systems. This is a vendor-neutral, community effort featuring examples from a variety of solutions

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